TWO artworks from schools in Tynedale have been selected to be printed on to silk flags and paraded at the Queen's Platinum Jubilee Pageant.

The Pageant will take place in London on Sunday, June 5.

Corbridge Middle School, Chollerton Church of England First School and Whitley Chapel Church of England First School were selected for their contributions to a project encouraging environmental awareness.

The project, titled River of Hope, is organised by the Thames Festival Trust and encourages young people to consider safeguarding the environment.

One design, titled 'It's Not Black and White', was created by Year 8 pupils in Corbridge Middle School.

Hexham Courant: ART: 'It's Not Black and White' produced by Corbridge Middle School. Image: Corbridge Middle School ART: 'It's Not Black and White' produced by Corbridge Middle School. Image: Corbridge Middle School

Students wrote messages to the Queen raising concerns about the environment, such as drilling for oil and river pollution.

One Corbridge pupil stated: "It felt good to be able to send a message to the Queen on her Jubilee about the need to protect life on Earth. I'm really concerned about climate change."

The snowflake images allude to young people's depiction as 'snowflakes', having been viewed as less resilient than previous generations.

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Dr Meryl Batchelder, a teacher at Corbridge Middle School, said: "On the contrary, although the burden of the climate emergency and the biodiversity crisis weighs heavily on their shoulders, young people bring hope for the future."

The second design, entitled 'Nurture Nature', was created as a collaboration between Chollerton First School and Whitley Chapel First School.

It illustrates how people around the world use water for washing, drinking and growing plants.

Hexham Courant: ART: 'Nurture Nature', by Chollerton First School and Whitley Chapel First School. Image: Chollerton First School and Whitley Chapel First SchoolART: 'Nurture Nature', by Chollerton First School and Whitley Chapel First School. Image: Chollerton First School and Whitley Chapel First School

The design also shows how aquatic life needs clean, unpolluted water to survive.

One Whitley Chapel pupil said: "My dream is to be able to clean up the world and stop people putting rubbish in the seas so that the fish don't eat the rubbish in the seas."

At Chollerton, Year 4 children said they "hoped everyone in the world could have clean water and stay hydrated."

The three schools involved are part of the Tyne Valley Connecting Classrooms partnership supported by the British Council to encourage global learning.

Before the pandemic, teachers from the Valley had exchange visits with teachers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, which has much lower carbon emissions than the UK but will be more detrimentally impacted by climate change.

Dr Batchelder said pupils in all three schools enjoyed participating in this important project, and are proud to have been selected for this opportunity to showcase their work.